Thursday, May 21, 2009

Why I Don't Believe in Global Warming

The question is asked often: "Do you believe in global warming?" And it's recently occurred to me that my answer is this:

No, I don't.

(Excuse me while I step on top of this soap box here. There.)

I don't believe in global warming because there's nothing to believe in.

There's nothing to believe in because things that require belief are those things that you cannot see, hear, touch, smell, taste, measure, analyze, understand, predict and change.

Global warming is a fact. That human beings have and are contributing to it is a proven theory.

The pattern is established. Causation is obvious. Effects can be measured and analyzed.

Predictions are as imperfect as all predictions are, but they are revealing that reality is actually falling on the "worst case scenario" end of the accuracy spectrum.

So do I believe in global warming?

No.

I accept global warming as a fact. I take the warnings very seriously. And I support efforts to curb it before it does more damage than we want to believe is possible.

Also, please stop asking, "Will the Earth survive? Can we save the planet?" The planet will survive no matter what we do. This isn't about "the planet." It's about the survival of a species on that planet that I happen to care about.

So stop framing global warming in terms of "belief" and "saving the planet." Let's get real about how we talk about this issue so we can get real about mitigating it.

(Exit soap box.)

3 comments:

Dan Bailey said...

Definitely.

I do believe, however, that 'global warming' is a bad name, as the effects will cause cooling in some areas. 'Global energy retention', while a mouthful, would be a better term.

Marc Conklin said...

From a marketing perspective, I would prefer to terms "Global Food Killing," "Fresh Water Evaporating" or "Global Drowning." I think that might get people's attention...

Joe F said...

I read somewhere a scientist actually say it would be more appropriate to say "Global Weirding" where the weather becomes far more erratic, extreme, and unpredictable.